Conservation Education Sea Turtle Sculpture and Coral Reef Reference

The second sculpture in the You’re Killing Me Conservation Education Sea Turtle Sculptures has been in a holding pattern for a long time. She is started now with a working title – Marine Debris. This sculpture will be worked on in my after regular studio hours – so we will see how long I can stay awake this next month.

The next two photos are images next in line for my coral reef commission critters.

Open House Viewing Black Lab and Sale of 20 Years of Glass Studies

OPEN HOUSE VIEWING OF
“Lexa Eve – A Moment in Time “

Pre Moving SALE of Artist Studies and Glass pieces
from 20 years of things in storage. (includes turtle artwork)

Dragonfly Glass, Heather Carter, Christmas Ornament Sale

Friday, December 14, 2018 6 to 9 PM
Saturday, December 15, 2019 11AM to 3PM
Sunday, December 16, 2019 12 to 3PM

204 Flower St., Unit #3, Hamilton, MT., 59840 (406) 375-9028  

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC WOMEN OF IMPACT

TODAY….AT 12:30PM MONTANA TIME….my statement paragraphs about my involvement with sea turtle conservation and my sea turtle artwork went public on the NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC WOMEN OF IMPACT Facebook site. This is a closed group of 45,000 plus, so I cannot send all of you to see it there….BUT OH WHAT A FEELING!!!! It is my hope, that some one will have a connection so that Cycle of Life: Sea Turtle Glass Sculpture – can come out of storage and find a home. A place where the parts of the sculpture can teach all about the perils sea turtles face. HAPPY TURTLE DANCE….viewings world wide magnified. WOW!

Woman of Impact First Statement July 4, 2018

Thank you for setting up this site, and for Kate Stone, wildlife biologist and ecologist extraordinaire for adding me to the group. I am a wildlife glass artist and sea turtle conservationist. My fascination with turtles began with a red eared slider when I was three or four years old. Later in my life I helped collect data on pond turtles in Oregon and setup a seven aquarium hospital ward for pond turtles in my dining room. In other words, turtles have always been part of my life. In the last few years, starting with the Deep Horizon Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico, in 2010, I have started creating my personal cast glass sculptures to educate the public about the hazards that threatened and endangered sea turtles and other marine wildlife face each day.

Starting with a clay and wood prototype in 2011, and then finishing the sculpture with a team in working sessions from August, 2015 to July 2017 – “Cycle of Life: Sea Turtle Glass Sculpture – Environmental Art Education Project was born. The Cycle of Life Project is to raise awareness of and educate people to the dangers to sea turtles. The project includes an installation of over 60 cast and fused glass pieces depicting life-size sea turtles and hatchlings along with elements that endanger them. The elements include slumped glass oil sludge, oil covered predators, plastic in multiple forms, a cast glass 4 wheeler tread running over a glass sea turtle nest and beach sand. The sculpture’s custom wood base is 5’x6’x 21” with protection stanchions that are made with wood and shrimp trawler net increasing the foot print to 8’x9’.

We continue looking for a permanent installation home for the Cycle of Life environmental art project. Be it aquarium, marine museum, sea turtle hospital – where it can do the job it was created for – to educate about the dangers that imperil sea turtles and other marine wildlife. If any of you know of a possible location, please contact me. Image below.

In October 2015, Artists for Conservation, an international wildlife fine art conservation organization, awarded me the AFC Monthly Conservation Artist Award, for my work with sea turtle projects, volunteering on sea turtle patrols and creating this project. In 2017, Artists for Conservation awarded me, their Environmental Statement Award in Sculpture for my first sculpture in a new grouping of conservation cast glass sea turtles. The title of the sculpture is:

“You’re Killing Me: Oceanic Assassins – Propellers and Plastic. Image below. This sculpture is the first in a group of 6 to 9 sculptures that will address perils that face sea turtles in the ocean and on the beach daily. Concurrently, I am working on a coral reef commission and been certified as a PADI Open Water Diver. This will allow me to work with sea turtles in the ocean as well as on the beach. The point of the art work and the sea turtle conservation work is to draw the observer into the beauty of the cast glass sculpture, while imparting a lesson as to what is happening with sea turtles, and what we can do to help them.

This last February I was honored to participate as an exhibitor in my first Southeastern Regional Sea Turtle Meeting in Myrtle Beach, SC. I plan to participate In the International Sea Turtle Symposium in Charleston, SC., in 2019. This last February I was privileged to watch post operation procedures on sea turtles at a sea turtle hospital on the east coast. As is has been said – it was a life changing moment. Currently I am house hunting in Florida, where I can be more active in all sea turtle aspects and have my conservation models close at hand.

Here is the link to the pdf on my website http://www.kathleensheard.com/…/Cycle_of_Life_Presentation.…

Here is a link to a Cycle of Life video on my website http://www.kathleensheard.com/2016/10/08/turtle/

Image may contain: table, food and water

“Turtle Lady” 100% donation for Cycle of Life

Barbara Liss, a sculptor, and owner of Montana Bliss Artworks, in Hamilton, Montana, has donated “Turtle Lady” to help finish funding my Cycle of Life sculpture. Barbara used a photo of me to create the work and incorporated one of my cast glass hatchlings into her concrete friend sculpture. 100% of this sale will be donated to Cycle of Life: Sea Turtle Glass Sculpture – Environmental Art Education Project. Many thanks to Barbara Liss for this donation!!! Please contact me through my website, if you are interested in purchasing this fun artwork and supporting my environmental art education project.

A week in the studio ….more then one week

A week laid out in the studio….it will take longer then this week….but one can only do pom pom crab legs for so long and then one has to switch to another project! And speaking of complex – Mr. Octopus is now drawn out on glass to begin. Then Miss Pom Pom to be followed by the Flame Angel Fish as there is a bit of room for one more on my smallest kiln shelf. Next the base plates of the black lab are drawn out for piece placement.  The following two images all the parts being set up to cut on my diamond saws and last …but not least….the first short driftwood section did not pass inspection, even with two additional layers – so a new one from scratch. Hi ho hi ho……

Charleen Romine’s Cast Glass Horse Head

Charleen did a clay model of a horse head last August when she was here for a workshop.  When she was in studio last month, we cast a wax from a silicon mold pulled from the clay and then made the plaster mold.   I assembled the glass colors she chose in glass billet and fired and finished her glass horse.  Prior to this cast glass sculpture Charleen has incorporated driftwood into several ceramic artworks she has created.

Two spots available…Wildlife in Glass Workshop – this weekend

The workshop is this coming weekend. A couple spaces are available and this is possibly the last opportunity to take this workshop in Montana. The sea turtles are calling my name so it is looking like I will be moving to Florida. Come join us and learn how to make detailed vitreous frit paintings – upside down and backwards!

Bitterroot College/University of Montana Summer Continuing Education. I will be teaching my Beginning/Continuing Wildlife in Glass Workshop, in my studio, in Hamilton, Montana, June 9 and 10 and the evening of June 12th. In the workshop students will use the micro-mosaic technique of fused glass to create artists studies that are detailed depictions of wildlife, landscapes or portraits. Two projects are slated for the weekend and opening of the kiln and critique on Tuesday night. For more details and to register call the college at (406) 375-0100 or visit WWW.UMT.EDU/BC.

Charleen Romine, from Georgia, in studio to work on horse panels

The studio was invaded by horse art work this last week. Charleen Romine, from Georgia, who has taken eight or so workshops from me over the years – in Georgia and here in Montana – was in the studio to complete three multiple layer, multiple fired panels. First group of photos is “Shine”. Second group is “Roxie” and the third grouping is Rook and Billie Holiday next to the barn wall.  The third panel was not completed this week.  “Rook” had an additional firing (plus more color studies), to work on the highlights on his forehead – and the result was not what Charleen hoped for.  She will complete this panel back in Georgia/North Carolina.  Charleen and I made a plaster mold of her other project – a horse head sculpture. She did the clay last August – I did the wax. The cast glass horse head when finished will have the inserted drift wood piece as his eye patch. I will cast the horse head for her in the next few weeks and then ship it to her.